Tag Archives: Human Rights

Dexter Dias: ‘Justice is collective therapy’

This piece was originally published by The Justice Gap.   Dexter Dias is never more than a few sentences away from a thought experiment. This is one of them: You’re watching a game between two players, Maria and Denise. They can’t see you, but you can see them. You enjoy the competition as they try to outwit each other, some rounds going Maria’s way, others won by Denise. Then, something changes. Out of Denise’s sight, Maria hits a button. The game becomes skewed, and Maria starts to win every round. You watch for a while, as the cheat prospers, and then you’re told you can leave. On the way out, you’re given £10 for your time. You’re then asked if you want to give £2 back to even the game up. Chances are, so the experiments tell us, you’ll hand over the money. ‘That tells us something very important,’ argues Dias. …

‘Deport first, appeal later’ policy breaches human rights

This piece was originally published by The Justice Gap.   The system of deporting foreign criminals before they have had a chance to appeal was in breach of their human rights, the Supreme Court has ruled. The court unanimously allowed the appeals in the cases of two foreign nationals who claimed that deportation would breach their right to private and family life. Kevin Kiarie, from Kenya, and Courtney Byndloss, from Jamaica, had been granted indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Both have longstanding family ties in Britain. In his judgment, released today, Lord Wilson concluded that the risk to public safety was ‘outweighed’ by the argument that ‘when we are afforded a right of appeal, our appeal should be effective.’ The home secretary, in other words, failed to prove that deportation in advance of an appeal ‘strikes a fair balance between the rights of the appellants and the interests of …

Manufacturing injustice

As Apple’s website displayed a poignant tribute to the man who made technology beautiful, very few of us spared a thought for those who made his dreams a reality: people like Wang Ling, Li Rongying and Lu Xin.  They are just three of 23 workers at Foxconn, Apple’s Chinese manufacturer, who have committed suicide since 2010.  Systemic abuse of workers’ employment and, dare I say it, human rights have been obfuscated by the lure of the dancing pixels – and you and I are part of the reason why. While we wait for higher resolution, the workers seem to be planning a revolution. Only last week, between three and four thousand underpaid and underappreciated Foxconn workers staged a walkout at the Zhengzhou plant.  A few weeks earlier, a protest at the Taiyuan factory descended into the mother of all broils, leaving 40 people in need of medical treatment. This hasn’t …